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Highlights from Venice: The Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Housed in the lavishly fabled Palazzo Venier dei Leoni (locally known as palazzo non finito or “the unfinished palace”) on Venice’s Grand Canal, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection holds an impressive array of modern art from the 20th century. From the late 1930s until the late 1970s, Peggy Guggenheim acquired works from artists at the forefront of the major art movements of the day including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, and Futurism. The result is awe-inspiring: an entire room of Jackson Pollock, works by Kandinsky and Miró, a dining room decked out in Picasso, Brancusi, and Braque. The property also boasts an outdoor sculpture garden with work by Alexander Calder and Arnaldo Pomodoro. Our image gallery above highlights just a few of ECFA’s favorite pieces on display!

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Highlights from Venice: Dubuffet at Palazzo Franchetti

 

Palazzo Franchetti is currently exhibiting works from three major series by the prolific French painter and father of Art Brut, Jean Dubuffet. The show, simply titled Jean Dubuffet & Venezia, honors Dubuffet’s affection for the city of Venice where he debuted two major series during his career: Hourloupe at the Palazzo Grassi in 1974 and Mires (‘Sights’) in the French pavilion at the 1984 Biennale. The exhibition includes numerous works from both Hourloupe and Mires as well as Célébration du sol. The paintings from Mires, as seen in our image gallery, exemplify Dubuffet’s Art Brut or “raw art” style with vibrant hues and charged networks of expressive marks.

 

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Highlights from Venice: The Biennale

 
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ECFA recently traveled to Venice, Italy to explore the fantastic collections and exhibitions surrounding the 2019 Biennale Arte. This year’s title for the 58th International Art Exhibition at the Biennale is aptly named May You Live In Interesting Times. Not so much a theme as an invitation, the title comes from an English expression that is falsely cited as a Chinese proverb. It simultaneously addresses today’s teetering socio-political climate while acting as entry point to engage with our world’s cultural complexities through art. Seventy-nine artists from around the world are featured in the exhibition including U.S. artists George Condo, Alex da Corte, Martine Gutierrez, Jimmie Durham, Darren Bader, and Ian Cheng.

 

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